Slashing CO2

Founded: 2018

HQ: Geneva, Switzerland

Cow feed additive that cuts methane by a third.

Big Picture

Cows’ natural digestive process produces methane, a green- house gas 84x as potent as CO2, which comes out in burps. Cumulatively, cattle raised for human consumption across the planet belch the equivalent of 5 Gt of CO2e per year. If they were a country this would place them sixth on the list of biggest polluters, right behind India. So reducing the GHG-intensity of meat and dairy is one of the top priorities of climate action.

How it Works

Their first product, Mootral Ruminant, is a natural feed additive based on compounds from garlic and citrus extract. It reduces methane emissions by 30-38% while improving milk yield in dairy cows by 3-5%. Trials also point to reduced reliance on antibiotics and lower prevalence of cattle flies. The product is also “Generally Recognized as Safe,” so it is in the market now and fits into existing supply chains.

Unfair Advantage

Mootral’s is the only ruminant feed additive to be certified for carbon credits (by Verra), providing a new revenue stream and marketing benefits for farmers. Together with the improved productivity of cows and reduced need for antibiotics, there is a strong financial incentive for adoption by farmers. These advantages will compound as they introduce new and adjacent products.  

30

Percent fewer

methane emissions per dairy cow

THOMAS HAFNER CEO & CO-FOUNDER

Thomas has 25 years of experience in scaling business and technologies in biotechnology, nutraceuticals, medical devices, and animal health.

Follow: @mrhafner

ISABELLE BOTTICELLI COO

Isabelle has spent 25 years with Unilever, Novartis, and GSK. Most recently, she was the European Head of Supply Chain and Quality for GSK.


The Business of Burps: Scientists Smell Profits in Cow Emissions

The New York Times

Cows Join Carbon Market in Quest to Curb Planet-Warming Burps

Bloomberg

Effect of Mootral—a garlic- and citrus-extract-based feed additive—on enteric methane emissions

Translational Animal Science (Journal)

Burping Cows Get the Green Light to Join Carbon-Offset Market

Bloomberg